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HOPETOUN HOUSE
REVIEW of ATTRACTION 2001

hopetoun house pictur ephotograph

If I were honest, if someone had asked me where Hopetoun House was before today I would have replied that I had heard of it but, sorry I don't know. Scotland somewhere? Well, today I stumbled across it whilst trying to find a completely different attraction belonging to the National Trust.
On a positive note though, Hopetoun House more than made up for any disappointment.
Two leading Scottish architects; Sir William Bruce and William Adam designed Hopetoun House. From the outside it is a slightly strange looking house and you would think that the original house had been extended many times or it was two houses joined together. In some ways both descriptions would be accurate.

The oldest part of the house is in the centre and it is here that you enter the attraction. This part was designed by William Bruce and was built between 1699 and 1707. This part contains many interesting features, which include some excellent wood carvings, paintings and ceiling paintings (especially at the top of the staircase). The second part, or addition to the house was started in 1721 by William Adam. In the main he added the facade, colonnades and state apartments which were used to great effect for social and entertainment purposes in the 18 Th. century. It is easy to imagine as you wander round the house, viewing such exhibits as the state dining room and the yellow drawing room, just how good life was for the "landed gentry" in those days.

The attraction also offers some fabulous gardens with many opportunities for picnics and photo opportunities, with the small Red Deer park offering similar opportunities. Another area which you should consider, if it is open, is the rooftop viewing area. This provides you with some magnificent photographic opportunities and some of those have been captured in my photo gallery

Despite being run by a charitable trust, the house is still lived in today by the present Marquess of Linlithgow and his family. He maintains much of the original character of the house whilst adding the essentials of any modern visitor attraction. It is well worth a visit especially with its close proximity to Edinburgh and the fact that, unlike National Trust properties, yes you can take pictures!


Hopetoun House
South Queensferry
West Lothian
Telephone: 0131 331 2451
Open (Normally) 1 April till 30 September. Phone ahead to check details
10AM till last entry of 4.30PM